Framing tallship Ceiba at AstilleroVerde. This framing deck is built of all local Cypress trees, and the frame itself is of sustinably-sourced Spanish Cedar.

Photo: Jeremy Starn.

Our shipyard crew is fed by the Women’s Association of Punta Morales every day. The president of the association, Marisol, is pictured. Our team has maintained excellent relations with these entrepreneurial ladies for over one year.  Photo: Jeremy Starn.

Our shipyard crew is fed by the Women’s Association of Punta Morales every day. The president of the association, Marisol, is pictured. Our team has maintained excellent relations with these entrepreneurial ladies for over one year.

Photo: Jeremy Starn.

Trained wooden boat builder Connie reads a template for frame number 48 of the large wooden ship,  Ceiba .    Photo: Jeremy Starn.

Trained wooden boat builder Connie reads a template for frame number 48 of the large wooden ship, Ceiba.

Photo: Jeremy Starn.

Co-founder of the shipyard Association, Lynx Guimond works to re-position our specialized tilting ships’ saw.    Photo: Jeremy Starn.

Co-founder of the shipyard Association, Lynx Guimond works to re-position our specialized tilting ships’ saw.

Photo: Jeremy Starn.

The jungle shipyard has this name for a reason: many types of tropical fruits grow here, feeding the crew. This is a small  guanabana  just picked from the tree. Photo:  Jeremy Starn.

The jungle shipyard has this name for a reason: many types of tropical fruits grow here, feeding the crew. This is a small guanabana just picked from the tree. Photo:

Jeremy Starn.

Another photo of the framing deck, or stage. This grandiose Cypress staircase was built in January 2019. The canvas roof of this shipbuilding hangar were sewn on site by local Costa Rican seamstresses.    Photo: Danielle Doggett.

Another photo of the framing deck, or stage. This grandiose Cypress staircase was built in January 2019. The canvas roof of this shipbuilding hangar were sewn on site by local Costa Rican seamstresses.

Photo: Danielle Doggett.

Above Banner Photos
Drone: Jose Pablo Monge.
Artisinal Fishermen: Jeremy Starn.

Lynx and Francisco work the fixed-blade sawmill, which is capable of ripping the densest hardwoods in the world. Shown on the sawmill is Tamarindo del Monte (Latin:  dialium guianese ), which was naturally wind-fallen by Hurricane Otto in Bijagua, Northern Costa Rica.  Photo: Danielle Doggett.

Lynx and Francisco work the fixed-blade sawmill, which is capable of ripping the densest hardwoods in the world. Shown on the sawmill is Tamarindo del Monte (Latin: dialium guianese), which was naturally wind-fallen by Hurricane Otto in Bijagua, Northern Costa Rica.

Photo: Danielle Doggett.